Insect Control

BUG IDENTIFIERS

 

Sugar Ants

Sugar ants eat anything, like cheese, nuts, meats, bread, honey honeydew, seeds and even insects. There is nothing to worry about when it comes to health risks, but it is important to always be careful as sugar ants still contaminate food. That being said, you should get rid of sugar ants by all means.

 

Carpenter Ants

Carpenter ants are both winged & non winged. The more winged ants you see the larger the infestation. The larger the infestation the greater the potential for damage. Secondly these ants do not just nest in wooded environments they will go anywhere that is cool, dark and slightly damp even behind concrete.

 

Bed Bugs

Bed bugs are increasingly becoming a problem within residences of all kinds, including homes, apartments, hotels. Unless you exterminate the bed, floor, bottom of dressers etc. not only in the room with the bed bugs but each room on either side of the original room, the problem may still exist.

 

Black Widows

Black widows are notorious spiders identified by the colored, hourglass-shaped mark on their abdomens. Several species answer to the name, and they are found in temperate regions around the world.

This spider’s bite is much feared because its venom is reported to be 15 times stronger than a rattlesnake’s. In humans, bites produce muscle aches, nausea, and a paralysis of the diaphragm that can make breathing difficult; however, contrary to popular belief, most people who are bitten suffer no serious damage—let alone death. But bites can be fatal—usually to small children, the elderly, or the infirm.

 

Brown Recluse Spider

Brown recluse spiders are not typical to Western Montana.

 

Hobo Spiders

(visit Wikipedia)
There is no difference in size between male and female Hobo Spiders. The male Hobo Spider is responsible for most bites, as it enters homes in search of females.

Bees

Bees are flying insects closely related to wasps and ants, and are known for their role in pollination and for producing honey and beeswax. There are nearly 20,000 known species of bees in seven to nine recognized families, though many are undescribed and the actual number is probably higher. They are found on every continent except Antarctica, in every habitat on the planet that contains insect-pollinated flowering plants.

 

Wasps

The various species of wasps fall into one of two main categories: solitary wasps and social wasps. Adult solitary live and operate alone, and most do not construct nests (below); all adult solitary wasps are fertile. By contrast, social wasps exist in colonies numbering up to several thousand strong and build nests—but in some cases not all of the colony can reproduce. In the more advanced species, just the wasp queen and male wasps can mate, whilst the majority of the colony is made up of sterile female workers.

The following characteristics are present in most wasps:

 

Two pairs of wings
An ovipositor, or stinger

 

Spider Mites

Spider mites (Family: Tetranychidae) are classed as a type of arachnid, relatives of insects that also includes spiders, ticks, daddy-longlegs and scorpions. Spider mites are small and often difficult to see with the unaided eye. Their colors range from red and brown to yellow and green, depending on the species of spider mite and seasonal changes in their appearance.

Many spider mites produce webbing, particularly when they occur in high populations. This webbing gives the mites and their eggs some protection from natural enemies and environmental fluctuations. Webbing produced by spiders, as well as fluff produced by cottonwoods, often is confused with the webbing of spider mites.

 

Boxelders Beattles

Boxelder bugs are a nuisance in and around homes from fall through early spring.
The bug overwinters as an adult in protected places such as houses or other buildings.
Removing female boxelder trees is the most permanent solution to the problem, although this may not be practical or desirable.
Laundry detergents offer safe, effective control when applied directly to the insects.

 

For most people, the boxelder bug needs no introduction. This bug is about 1/2 inch long as an adult, black with three red lines on the thorax (the part just behind the head), a red line along each side, and a diagonal red line on each wing. The immature forms are smaller and are easily distinguished from the adults by their red abdomens and lack of wings. Boxelder bugs become a nuisance in and around homes from fall through early spring.

 

Earwigs

In a season, females reproduce up to 20-60 eggs laid in burrows (called chambers), 2 to 3 inches beneath the soil. Usually only removed by a professional exterminator.

Centipedes

Centipedes kill and eat a variety of things, like bedbugs, termites, silverfish, spiders, and even roaches. So if you have Centipedes around your home or office you have a much larger problem than just Centipedes. Odds are you have up to 5 other types of insects that are food sources for the Centipede.

 

Roly Pollies

Roly-poly bugs are a pest category of occasional invaders. They are crustaceans closely related to crayfish & shrimp, more so than to insects. A Pillbug has the ability to roll its body into a ball resembling a small pill.  They prefer damp areas, which is why they are often found invading homes through openings close to patio doors, laundry rooms and basements.

RODENTS:

 

Mice

A male mouse is called a buck. A female mouse is called a doe. To this day some people believe that fried mice or mouse pie is a cure for bed wetting. The mouse reproduces 6 to 10 litters a year with 10 to 12 in each litter.

Rats

Rats are some of the most troublesome and damaging rodents in the United States. They consume and contaminate food, damage structures and property, and transmit parasites and diseases to other animals and humans. Rats live and thrive under a wide variety of climates and conditions; they are often found in and around homes and other buildings, farms, gardens, and open fields.

 

Squirrels

Squirrels belong to a large family of small or medium-sized rodents called the Sciuridae. The family includes tree squirrels, ground squirrels, chipmunks, marmots (including woodchucks), flying squirrels, and prairie dogs.Squirrels breed once or twice a year, and give birth to a varying number of young after three to six weeks, depending on species. The young are born naked, toothless, helpless, and blind. In almost all species, only the female looks after the young, which are weaned at around six to ten weeks of age, and become sexually mature at the end of their first year.

 

Pocket Gopher

These are the “true” gophers, though several ground squirrels of the family Sciuridae are often called gophers as well. The name “pocket gopher” on its own may be used to refer to any of a number of genera within the family.

 

Voles

A vole is a small rodent resembling a mouse but with a stouter body, a shorter, hairy tail, a slightly rounder head, smaller ears and eyes, and differently formed molars (high-crowned and with angular cusps instead of low-crowned and with rounded cusps). There are approximately 155 species of voles. They are sometimes known as meadow mice or field mice in North America.

 

Packrats

Packrats have a rat-like appearance with long tails, large ears and large black eyes. Compared to deer mice, harvest mice and grasshopper mice, packrats are noticeably larger and are usually somewhat larger than cotton rats.